Ed’s Story

My niece Camille was diagnosed with breast cancer at age 27 in 2008. Because of the history in her family (her aunt and mother both died from breast cancer), she opted to immediately have a double mastectomy. It was a dark period for her and for our family.

I wanted to give her something to focus on beyond the surgery and the post-surgery radiation treatments. We both like to run, so I challenged her to race the Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure in our hometown, Baton Rouge, about six months after her surgery.

I got involved with Susan G. Komen especially to provide visibility to the issue of breast cancer in young adults and the importance of doing the monthly self-examination.

We were both there, together with many of our family members, and we bonded and celebrated that she had gotten past the initial treatment. She and I were featured on a local TV station, and Camille won the survivor’s division in what was her very first competitive race.

I got involved with Susan G. Komen especially to provide visibility to the issue of breast cancer in young adults and the importance of doing the monthly self-examination. I volunteer supporting the information technology needs of the Suncoast Affiliate and the important role it has in addressing the underserved in our area.

Today, Camille is doing well. Her doctor says she has less than a 1% chance of a recurrence. She’s happy, healthy, and since that first Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure she has done several more Races for the Cure, half marathons, and has run the NYC Marathon twice. She’s a survivor, a fighter, and an inspiration to me and to those around her.

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